The most effective sunscreen

Discussions on what sun damage is and how to avoid it.
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newbie_face1
Posts: 9
Joined: Fri Apr 22, 2011 7:58 am

The most effective sunscreen

Post by newbie_face1 »

Hi Tom,
It's been a while since I posted. I've been playing more outdoor soccer lately and when it's sunny out I wear a lot of sunscreen.
I've read that zinc oxide and titanium dioxide are the most effective against UVA/UVB Rays. Yet, very recently, reports
say that these chemicals can now cause melanoma because the sun's rays cause a chemical reaction which creates free
radicals. Does any of this make sense?

Tom Hagerty
Site Admin
Posts: 288
Joined: Wed Nov 24, 2010 1:04 pm

Re: The most effective sunscreen

Post by Tom Hagerty »

I've read that zinc oxide and titanium dioxide are the most effective against UVA/UVB Rays.
What you've read is probably true. Both of these minerals are sunblocks - they form a barrier between both of these rays and the skin. In other words, these minerals when applied correctly keep the rays of the sun from penetrating into the skin. Sunscreens - give you chemical protection and are mostly effective in absorbing and deflecting the UVB rays. Some of the ingredients of chemical sunscreens can enter into the bloodstream and cause problems, although this is rare.
Yet, very recently, reports say that these chemicals [the minerals in sunblocks] can now cause melanoma because the sun's rays cause a chemical reaction which creates free radicals.
Many people do not like sunblocks because they are not transparent - the zinc oxide and titanium dioxide just rest on the surface of the skin not looking too glamorous. So sunblock providers have used the new nanoparticle technology to create what people will be more happy with. Now it's possible to greatly miniaturize the minerals so they they will be absorbed into the skin. This makes the skin more attractive but there is a drawback. Some research has found that the absorption of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles can cause oxidative stress and even DNA damage - cancer. When you're looking for a sunblock product it might be hard to determine if you are getting what you really want. The labels usually do not disclose if the active ingredient is nanoparticles or not. You have to be a good detective.

Of course all sunscreens and sunblocks prevent the skin from making vitamin D. It might be a good idea to take a supplement if your vitamin D level is low. I take 2000 IU of D3 every day. It's an important nutrient. Maybe it will improve your soccer game. :D

newbie_face1
Posts: 9
Joined: Fri Apr 22, 2011 7:58 am

Re: The most effective sunscreen

Post by newbie_face1 »

Tom:
My neighbor is a hiker and marathon runner his skin is badly sun damaged and wrinkled. He doesn't like using sunscreens for the reason
you posted, the chemicals cause cancer. I know it's a crap shoot, I'm going with the sunscreen, otherwise why do facial exercises, right?

I'll try the Vit. D suggestion and let you know if my game improves. ;) I'm probably getting enough from the green smoothies that I do every morning.

Thanks Tom!

Tom R.

newbie_face1
Posts: 9
Joined: Fri Apr 22, 2011 7:58 am

Re: The most effective sunscreen

Post by newbie_face1 »

Found this today: http://shine.yahoo.com/healthy-living/c ... 00044.html
Some people have commented that coconut oil works as a protectant but I think it makes a better moisturizer.

Tom R.

Tom Hagerty
Site Admin
Posts: 288
Joined: Wed Nov 24, 2010 1:04 pm

Re: The most effective sunscreen

Post by Tom Hagerty »

My neighbor is a hiker and marathon runner his skin is badly sun damaged and wrinkled.
Overtraining, especially among marathon runners, almost always leads to prematurely older-looking faces. These exercise addicts often have strict diets too - no meat, and sometimes even no dairy products. And many don't "believe" in protecting their skin from the "natural" rays of the sun. These perfectionists build their lives around their exercise routines instead of having exercise as part of a healthy, balanced life.

But what contributes to the older-looking faces other than the sun damage? It's the massive cascade of free radicals generated by three hours of running and all the daily training involved in running a successful marathon. This enormous onslaught of free radicals ages the skin prematurely and adds lines and wrinkles to the face. There are many informative articles on the Internet that detail the pysiological process of free radical damage due to overtraining.

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